Donate

Adopt

Volunteer

Animal Care and Control

GOING BATTY? A MESSAGE FROM ANIMAL CARE & CONTROL ABOUT BATS 

If you're wondering whether bats are dangerous to humans or pets, you should know that the short answer to that question is “not if they are left alone.”  Contrary to popular belief, bats are not blind.  In fact they can see almost as well as humans. However, at night, their ears are more important than their eyes - they use a special sonar system called 'echolocation,' meaning they find things using echoes.  Because of this, bats have evolved into nocturnal (active at night) mammals.  During the day, bats are typically roosting in trees, rock, caves and buildings.  They prefer to avoid natural light.  If you see a bat during the day, it is best to leave it alone and let it snooze. At dusk, it will fly out to hunt for food which consists of insects such as beetles, moths and mosquitoes - which actually makes them our friends!  A bat can eat up to 12,000 mosquitoes in one hour!

bat_on_curtain.jpg

While it is true that most cases of rabies being transmitted are due to bats, a low percentage of bats actually carry rabies.  Each summer, Animal Care and Control (ACC) receives many phone calls about bats.  Typically, these calls are referred to the Health Department to determine if the bat should be left alone or captured and tested.  If the bat need to be captured, the Health Department will request ACC catch it.  Less than 10% of captured bats test positive for rabies.

People who are unvaccinated for rabies and untrained to handle bats should refrain from doing so. If you find an injured bat, do not attempt to help the animal yourself or touch it in any way. If the bat is in your house, close off that room and call the Health Department.

To help Washington pets and people stay healthy, state law requires all dogs, cats and ferrets, regardless of indoor or outdoor status, be vaccinated. If your pet does not have a current rabies vaccination, please contact your veterinarian to update their shot.

About ACC
Wenatchee Valley Animal Care and Control (ACC) is a separate LLC of Wenatchee Valley Humane Society and is a government contracted agency.  Its mission is to help protect the safety and well-being of the citizens and animals of our jurisdictions through compassion, education and law enforcement. ACC is contracted to provide services for the Cities of Cashmere, Chelan, East Wenatchee, Entiat, Rock Island, Wenatchee, the Town of Waterville and Chelan & Douglas Counties.

# # #

FOURTH OF JULY SAFETY TIPS FOR YOUR PET

WENATCHEE- The Fourth of July can be a fun day, sunshine, barbeques, swimming, music and, of course, fireworks. It isn’t necessarily fun for all members of your family though. Many pets are frightened by fireworks and escape from homes, yards or kennels due to panic.

scared-kitten.jpg

Each year, Wenatchee Valley Animal Care and Control (ACC) sees a significant rise in lost animals around the days leading up to the Fourth of July and days immediately following the celebration.

Dawn Davies, Executive Director for Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS) reminds pet owners that a current pet license and identification tags is an important part of reunited lost pets and their owners. “Our licenses are now on PetHub digital pet ID tags and, as long as the owner has registered the tag with PetHub, can help anyone contact a lost pet’s owner.”

Since the Fourth is ACC’s busiest day of the year, Davies says this is extremely helpful for all involved. “These tags give community members the chance to help which means pets get home faster and never have to come to the shelter.”

Davies notes that the Fourth is a holiday best celebrated with pets left at home. “It’s a stressful day. Crowds, heat, and sudden loud noises are all things that can cause even the friendliest, relaxed dog distress. And distress can cause animals to react negatively or panic and run.”

To help combat the amount of pets that go missing in our community, pets will not be allowed after 3 p.m. at the ‘Let’s Have a Blast’ celebration in Walla Walla Point Park.

WVHS offers the following tips for keeping your pet safe and stress-free for on the Fourth:

  • Make sure pets are in a secure space with something soft to curl up to and music softly playing.

  • Secure doors and windows.

  • Do not bring pets to any outdoor festivities where they cannot be secured and safe.

  • Ensure all tags or identification is up to date (if you have a 2019 PetHub license, make sure you’ve registered it for free with them).

  • Take your pet for a nice walk or have play time. A tired pet, is a relaxed pet.

If your pet becomes lost or you find a lost pet, contact ACC to file a report at 509-662-9577 or file one online, where you can also view photos of found animals. A visit to the shelter on July 5th, to see if your pet was brought in by ACC or a concerned citizen is also recommended.

'DOGS IN HOT CAR’ REPORTS INCREASE AS TEMPERATURES RISE

As temperatures increase, Wenatchee Valley Animal Care and Control (ACC) is responding to an alarming number of reports of dogs left in hot cars.  Numerous calls are received daily regarding this issue and, in some cases, dogs were removed from vehicles to prevent brain damage or death.  With temperatures now well above the seventy degree mark, people should consider leaving their dogs at home.  The interior of a car can quickly become an oven within minutes.  Leaving windows cracked or down a few inches is insufficient and will only result in a two to three degree difference to the vehicle’s interior.

dog-in-a-car.jpg

“We all love the companionship of our dogs, and most dogs love to go for car rides.  Sometimes, we just have to love them enough to leave them at home,” notes Dawn Davies, Executive Director of Wenatchee Valley Humane Society.

Per Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 16.52.340, animal control officers and law enforcement officers are authorized to enter a vehicle or enclosed space to remove an animal without liability to any damaged property.  It’s important to note this law only covers animal control and law enforcement officers, not the general public, and concerned citizens should call ACC or law enforcement if they see an animal who may be suffering or is in danger.

To report an animal in a vehicle who may be suffering, please call ACC at 509-662-9577 opt 1.

ABOUT ACC
Wenatchee Valley Animal Care and Control (ACC) is a separate LLC of Wenatchee Valley Humane Society and is a government contracted agency.  Its mission is to help protect the safety and well-being of the citizens and animals of our jurisdictions through compassion, education and law enforcement. ACC is contracted to provide services for the Cities of Cashmere, Chelan, East Wenatchee, Entiat, Rock Island, Wenatchee, the Town of Waterville and Chelan & Douglas Counties.

# # #

 

SEEKING INFORMATION ON DOG SHOT IN THE HEAD, LEFT TO DIE

IMG_4087.jpg

WENATCHEE- At approximately 9:30 PM on June 5th, 2019 a man found a severely injured dog on the side of the road near Bee Hive and Mission.  He brought the dog to Wenatchee Valley Humane Society where an Animal Care & Control Officer transported the dog to Countryside Veterinarian for emergency care.  X-rays confirmed that the dog had been shot at least three times by what looked to be a hollow point round from a small caliber pistol.  The three shots were to the head, neck and shoulder.  The dog is currently being treated by the WVHS veterinarian with pain medication and antibiotics.  It is not clear if the dog will survive.  The dog is a large adult male, American Pit Bull/Terrier mix, silver/white, neutered and has a previous abdominal scar, indicating that he has an owner.  When found, the dog was not wearing a collar and was without identification or microchip. 

If you have any information please call Wenatchee Animal Care & Control at 509-662-9577, Option 1.

About WVHS
Founded in 1967, the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS) is a private non-profit organization with a mission is to serve the community through education, protection and pet adoptions. We continue this mission by caring for displaced pets, rescuing injured and lost animals, providing a low cost spay/neuter program, hosting a pet food assistance bank, offering a Pets for Life program, investigating cruelties and finding homes for the orphaned animals. If you would like to volunteer, donate, or more information on how you can help, email wvhs@wenatcheehumane.org or call (509) 662-9577.

####

KEEP YOUR PETS SAFE ON THE FOURTH, BY KEEPING THEM AT HOME

WENATCHEE- The Fourth of July can be a fun day, sunshine, barbeques, swimming, music and, of course, fireworks. While entertaining for people, it can be terrifying for your pets. Many pets are frightened by fireworks and escape from homes, yards or kennels due to panic.

Every year, Wenatchee Valley Animal Care and Control (ACC) sees a significant rise in lost animals around the days leading up to the Fourth of July and for the days immediately following the celebration.

Shiloh Schauer, Chair of the Wenatchee Valley Fourth of July Committee, said the ‘Let’s Have a Blast’ Celebration at Walla Walla Point Park has seen an increase in frightened and lost dogs during the festival.

“Last year, our event team experienced a significant increase of lost and frighten dogs being turned in throughout the day. These fury friends clearly were not strays, they had just become separated from their owners.” Schauer explain. “We were all shocked by the number of terrified dogs being turned in during the firework performance.”

hiding_dog.jpg

Dawn Davies, Executive Director for Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS) reminds pet owners that the Fourth is a holiday for pets to stay home. “It’s a stressful day. Crowds, heat, and sudden loud noises are all things that can cause even the friendliest, relaxed dog distress. And distress can cause animals to react negatively or panic and run.”

Davies also reminds pet owners that a current pet license and identification tags is so important. “This year we switched our licensing tags to PetHub digital pet ID tags and, as long as the owner has registered it, can help anyone contact a lost pet’s owner.”

“These new tags give community members the chance to help which means pets get home faster and never have to come to the shelter.” Davies notes this is extremely helpful for all involved, since the Fourth is ACC’s busiest day of the year.

WVHS offers the following tips for keeping your pet safe and stress-free for on the Fourth:

  • Make sure your pets are in a secure space with something soft to curl up with and music softly playing.

  • Secure doors and windows.

  • Do not bring pets to any outdoor festivities where they cannot be secured and safe.

  • Make sure any tags or identification is up to date (if you have a 2018 PetHub license, make sure you’ve registered it for free with them).

  • Take your pet for a nice walk or have play time. A tired pet, is a relaxed pet.

If your pet becomes lost or you find a lost pet, contact ACC to file a report at 509-662-9577 or file one online, where you can also view photos of found animals. A visit to the shelter on July 5th, to see if your pet was brought in by ACC or a concerned citizen is also recommended.

About WVHS

Founded in 1967, the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS) is a private non-profit organization with a mission is to serve the community through education, protection and pet adoptions. We continue our mission by caring for displaced pets, rescuing injured and lost animals, providing a low cost spay/neuter program, hosting a pet food assistance bank, offering a Pets for Life program, investigating cruelties and finding homes for the orphaned animals. If you would like to volunteer, donate, or more information on how you can help, email wvhs@wenatcheehumane.org or call (509) 662-9577.

####

‘DOGS IN HOT CAR’ REPORTS INCREASE AS TEMPERATURES RISE

dog-in-car.jpg

As temperatures increase, Wenatchee Valley Animal Care and Control (ACC) is responding to an alarming number of reports of dogs left in hot cars.  Numerous calls are received daily regarding this issue and, in some cases, dogs were removed from vehicles to prevent brain damage or death.  With temperatures now well above the seventy degree mark, people should consider leaving their dogs at home.  The interior of a car can quickly become an oven within minutes.  Leaving windows cracked or down a few inches is insufficient and will only result in a two to three degree difference to the vehicle’s interior.

“We all love the companionship of our dogs, and most dogs love to go for car rides.  Sometimes, we just have to love them enough to leave them at home,” notes Dawn Davies, Executive Director of Wenatchee Valley Humane Society.

Per Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 16.52.340, animal control officers and law enforcement officers are authorized to enter a vehicle or enclosed space to remove an animal without liability to any damaged property.  It’s important to note this law only covers animal control and law enforcement officers, not the general public, and concerned citizens should call ACC or law enforcement if they see an animal who may be suffering or is in danger.

To report an animal in a vehicle who may be suffering, please call ACC at 509-662-9577 opt 1.

ABOUT ACC
Wenatchee Valley Animal Care and Control (ACC) is a separate LLC of Wenatchee Valley Humane Society and is a government contracted agency.  Its mission is to help protect the safety and well-being of the citizens and animals of our jurisdictions through compassion, education and law enforcement. ACC is contracted to provide services for the Cities of Cashmere, Chelan, East Wenatchee, Entiat, Rock Island, Wenatchee, the Town of Waterville and Chelan & Douglas Counties.

# # #