Donate

Adopt

Volunteer

Animal Welfare

HUMANE SOCIETY ASKS COMMUNITY MEMBERS TO BE THE HERO

WENATCHEE—(January 28, 2019) Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS) invites you to help homeless animals in the Wenatchee Valley by attending its annual Auction for the Animals, taking place Saturday, February 16, 2018 at the Wenatchee Valley Convention Center.

Be the Hero with presenting sponsor.png

This year’s event theme is “Be the Hero” and superhero attire is encouraged. Shelter staff hopes to see many attendees donning capes and channel their inner superhero. The event boasts an evening of fun including a buffet dinner, no host bar, booth games, and both a silent and live auction.

The live auction features several exciting packages, including a African Safari trip, Seattle Seahawks quarterback, Russell Wilson, autographed jersey, private cabana weekend on Lake Chelan and many more thrilling adventures and items you won’t want to miss.

Doors open at 5 p.m. and silent auction and games begin at 5:30, with dinner and live auction to follow.

Presenting sponsor for this year event is The Gilded Lily. Other sponsors include After Hours Plumbing, Pipkin Construction, Sangster Motors, GTC Technical Support, Laura Mounter Real Estate, and Northern Fruit, along with other supporting businesses. Auction items have been generously donated by individual and business donors throughout our community and beyond.

Auction for the Animals is the event of the year for animal lovers and all proceeds benefit Wenatchee Valley Humane Society. Tickets are just $65. To purchase yours, visit www.wenatcheehumane.org or in person at the shelter, 1474 S. Wenatchee Avenue.

About WVHS
Founded in 1967, the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society is a private non-profit organization and our mission is to serve the community through education, protection and pet adoptions. We continue our mission by taking care of displaced pets, rescuing injured and lost animals, continuing our spay/neuter program, investigating cruelties and finding homes for the orphaned animals. If you would like to volunteer, donate, or more information on how you can help, visit www.wenatcheehumane.org, email wvhs@wenatcheehumane.org or call (509) 662-9577.

###

ANIMALS AT WENATCHEE VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY BEGIN TAKING DAILY BREAKS

sleeping_kitten.jpg

WENATCHEE, WA- Beginning Monday, January 7, 2019, Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS) is changing its weekday hours of operation to implement a new ‘Quiet Time’ for the animals at the shelter. When the program launches Monday, the shelter will begin closing for an hour on weekdays, from 1:30-2:30 p.m.

The new ‘Quiet Time’ will give animals at the shelter a much needed midday break. Currently, shelter animals begin their day at 6 a.m. and live in a constant state of stimulation, with approximately 12 hours of disruption, including: kennel cleaning, feeding time, medical checks, dog walking, behavior modification, socialization with volunteers, and potential adopters visiting.

During ‘Quiet Time’ adoption halls will be closed to any activity with lights out and music off.  Recent research presented at the ASPCA Learning Lab shows that pets in shelter and kennel environments benefit tremendously when they are allowed at least one hour of downtime during the day. The break helps calm the animal, reduces illnesses and helps overall demeanor.

Animals also need enrichment to keep them curious and reduce boredom while waiting for a new forever home.  “Our awesome volunteers love to make and hand out enrichment items like stuffed Kong toys, bark boxes, toys and frozen pup cups,” says WVHS Executive Director, Dawn Davies. “The goal is to provide shelter animals a healthy balance of enrichment and socialization while reducing over-stimulation, which can have a negative impact on their behavior and health.”

sleeping_dog.jpg

Davies demonstrated the need for ‘Quiet Time’ to shelter staff and board of directors by asking each of them to sit in a dog kennel for five minutes while normal every day activities went on around them. “It sounds silly, but the experience really helps to build empathy for the individual needs of each animal in our care.”

Shelter staff will also benefit from this change, utilizing the allocated time to take uninterrupted breaks, participating in meetings, trainings, and updating animal records. Davies says she also sees this time as a way to reduce the overall staff stress of handling constant, emergent situations.

Animal Care and Control (ACC) can be reached during this ‘Quiet Time’ by phone at 509-662-9577, option 1, however the lobby is closed for licensing and other ACC-related business during this hour.

Shelter hours of operation are 11 a.m.-6 p.m. (closed 1:30-2:30 p.m., beginning January 7, 2019), Monday through Friday and 11 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. The shelter is located at 1474 Wenatchee Ave., Wenatchee.

About the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society
Founded in 1967, the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS) is a private non-profit organization with a mission is to serve the community through education, protection and pet adoptions. We continue our mission by caring for displaced pets, rescuing injured and lost animals, providing a low cost spay/neuter program, hosting a pet food assistance bank, offering a Pets for Life program, investigating cruelties and finding homes for the orphaned animals. If you would like to volunteer, donate, or more information on how you can help, email wvhs@wenatcheehumane.org or call (509) 662-9577.

###

Wenatchee Valley Humane Society Participates in ASPCA Learning Lab Program to Help Shelter Dogs with Behavior Issues

Hands-on training at ASPCA Behavioral Rehabilitation Center provides
innovative techniques and protocols to help homeless dogs nationwide

WENATCHEE, WASH.—The Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS) today announces its partnership with the ASPCA® (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) through the Learning Lab program. This program, based at the ASPCA Behavioral Rehabilitation Center in Weaverville, North Carolina, is an interactive educational program where select shelters participate in an intensive, hands-on workshop and discuss all aspects of advanced behavioral care in animal shelters.

WVHS Core Group Photo 4.jpg

WVHS is among the first group of animal welfare agencies to participate in the ASPCA Learning Lab program and will be applying key learnings to integrate behavioral and psychological support for homeless dogs into its entire sheltering operation. The WVHS team was chosen for the selective program after taking part in an in-depth application and shelter visitation process.

“We were honored to be invited to send six of our key staff to participate in a four-day Learning Lab retreat at the ASPCA Behavioral Rehabilitation Center in North Carolina,” said Dawn Davies, WVHS Executive Director. “The ASPCA Learning Lab demonstrated game-changing techniques in both a classroom and hands-on environment.   The ASPCA tailored private training to specifically address the challenges that we face as an open-door shelter in greater Wenatchee. We are excited to implement new tools to enrich shelter life not only for animals, but for our dedicated staff too, and ultimately, to increase our success rate of placing hard to adopt animals into forever homes.”

WVHS Core Medical 8.jpg

“Wenatchee Valley Humane Society has a highly skilled, insightful, and cohesive team and we had impactful working sessions together over the course of the four-day retreat,” added Dr. Katherine Miller, Senior Director of the ASPCA Learning Lab program. “We’re excited that they are joining the Learning Lab’s network of shelter partners and we look forward to continued collaboration on methods to elevate behavioral healthcare in animal shelters.”

The ASPCA Learning Lab launched in 2018 at the ASPCA Behavioral Rehabilitation Center, the first-ever permanent facility dedicated to the rehabilitation and study of extremely fearful, unadoptable homeless dogs, most of whom are victims of cruelty or neglect. As the Learning Lab program evolves, the ASPCA plans to develop a national network of partner organizations that can share learnings and best practices and serve as specialized behavioral rehabilitation hubs in their communities.

The work of the Behavioral Rehabilitation Center is showcased in an award-winning ASPCA documentary, “Second Chance Dogs”, which is available on secondchancedogsfilm.com. For more information on the ASPCA Behavioral Rehabilitation Center, please visit aspca.org/BRC.

About the ASPCA®
Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

About the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society
Founded in 1967, the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS) is a private non-profit organization with a mission is to serve the community through education, protection and pet adoptions. We continue our mission by caring for displaced pets, rescuing injured and lost animals, providing a low cost spay/neuter program, hosting a pet food assistance bank, offering a Pets for Life program, investigating cruelties and finding homes for the orphaned animals. If you would like to volunteer, donate, or more information on how you can help, email wvhs@wenatcheehumane.org or call (509) 662-9577.

# # #

NEW SHELTER PROGRAM HELP DOGS MAKE EASIER ADOPTION TRANSITIONS

WENATCHEE, WA- Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS) has added behavior and obedience programs to their list of resources. The programs are a tool used to help some of the more rambunctious and untrained dogs at the shelter.  The goal is to reduce their length of stay at the shelter and increase their adoptability.

Shelter Volunteer, Michelle Ott and Mavrick (Photo 2).jpg

“Dogs that come to the shelter with behavior issues have a difficult time being adopted,” explains WVHS Executive Director, Dawn Davies. “Long lengths of stay in a shelter setting are stressful for animals. Our goal is to give these dogs every opportunity to find their forever home, as quickly as possible. Adding a dog behavior program that teaches positive habits, confidence for good manners and basic obedience skills was the next natural step for us to take.”

All dogs entering the shelter are evaluated. Those who show signs of treatable behavior issues are placed into either the Canine Good Citizen-Ready (CGC) program or the Total Obedience Program (TOP) Dog program. Both programs give dogs a second chance for a happy home through training, diligence, and one-on-one development.

Karen Headlee and Scooter 1.jpg

In the CGC program, WVHS staff and volunteers work with the selected shelter dogs to train them on specific good behavior skills, with a goal of mastering them. Mastering these behaviors prepares them for the American Kennel Club CGC Test and once ready, shelter dogs are tested on ten real-world scenarios. If they pass, they are labeled ‘CGC Ready.’ Adopters of these dogs will be briefed on their dog’s skill set and are encouraged to work with an independent CGC Evaluator for CGC certification testing.

Dogs participating in the TOP dog program work on skills similar to the CGC-Ready Program but in addition to good behavior skills, TOP Dogs learn advanced skills specific to each dog’s needs. Adopters of TOP Dog participants have the opportunity to visit WVHS with their dog, where the owner can learn the training skills received during the program and earn a WVHS TOP Dog certificate.

About the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society

Founded in 1967, the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS) is a private non-profit organization with a mission is to serve the community through education, protection and pet adoptions. We continue our mission by caring for displaced pets, rescuing injured and lost animals, providing a low cost spay/neuter program, hosting a pet food assistance bank, offering a Pets for Life program, investigating cruelties and finding homes for the orphaned animals. If you would like to volunteer, donate, or more information on how you can help, email wvhs@wenatcheehumane.org or call (509) 662-9577.

###

HUMANE SOCIETY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR HELPS LEAD CHARGE ON STATEWIDE PET LIFE-SAVING EFFORTS

Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS) Executive Director, Dawn Davies, has joined other public and private animal welfare leaders throughout Washington State to launch Pet Alliance of Washington (PAW). The Coalition, who's mission is to increase lifesaving efforts of organizations within Washington State that provide care for stray, neglected and abused cats and dogs has also gained the help from Best Friends, a national organization with extensive experience improving animal outcomes.

Dawn-Davies.jpg

“While our shelter may be thriving, others are barely surviving.” says Davies, “There are many outlying areas in Washington that are a resource desert in terms of animal welfare.”

“WVHS is the only private, non-profit humane society in North Central Washington, primarily serving Chelan and Douglas County,” Davies explains, “As much as we would like to extend our life-saving programs to neighboring counties, we simply don’t have the capacity.”

The coalition was founded after a group of animal welfare professionals from several regions in Washington State took notice of issues within the animal welfare industry and identified that many could benefit from a collaborative and regional approach, rather that attempting to solve the same issues on an individual level. Strategies implemented by the coalition are set to boost pet save rates and improve outcomes and includes mentoring Pet Alliance members on model programs, grant funding, and direct action.

As one of the founding board of directors for PAWS, Davies is excited to share her experience and the success at WVHS to help others. “The Board of Directors is inspired to lead a statewide effort to reach a 90% live release rate by 2020,” Davies notes. “WVHS has maintained a 93% live release rate since 2015 by providing programs such as Trap/Neuter/Return, Pets For Life and Low Cost Spay and Neuter clinics. I am hoping that our experience will be helpful to other organizations.”

“It’s heartbreaking when I hear of high euthanasia rates and populations of unwanted litters, which is preventable,” she continues. “I am looking forward to working with PAW to mentor and assist other non-profit agencies, while bringing awareness to North Central Washington.”

Other members of PAWS’s board includes recognized animal welfare leaders from Seattle Humane (SH), Humane Society for SW Washington (HSSW), Blue Mountain Humane Society, Kitsap Humane Society, Pasado’s Safe Haven, Northwest Spay and Neuter Center, Regional Animal Services of King County (RASKC), South County Cats, Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service (SCRAPS), and Best Friends Animal Society (Best Friends).

About WVHS
Founded in 1967, the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society is a private non-profit organization with a mission is to serve the community through education, protection and pet adoptions. We continue our mission by caring for displaced pets, rescuing injured and lost animals, providing a low cost spay/neuter program, hosting a pet food assistance bank, offering a Pets for Life program, investigating cruelties and finding homes for the orphaned animals. If you would like to volunteer, donate, or more information on how you can help, email wvhs@wenatcheehumane.org or call (509) 662-9577.

####

KEEP YOUR PETS SAFE ON THE FOURTH, BY KEEPING THEM AT HOME

WENATCHEE- The Fourth of July can be a fun day, sunshine, barbeques, swimming, music and, of course, fireworks. While entertaining for people, it can be terrifying for your pets. Many pets are frightened by fireworks and escape from homes, yards or kennels due to panic.

Every year, Wenatchee Valley Animal Care and Control (ACC) sees a significant rise in lost animals around the days leading up to the Fourth of July and for the days immediately following the celebration.

Shiloh Schauer, Chair of the Wenatchee Valley Fourth of July Committee, said the ‘Let’s Have a Blast’ Celebration at Walla Walla Point Park has seen an increase in frightened and lost dogs during the festival.

“Last year, our event team experienced a significant increase of lost and frighten dogs being turned in throughout the day. These fury friends clearly were not strays, they had just become separated from their owners.” Schauer explain. “We were all shocked by the number of terrified dogs being turned in during the firework performance.”

hiding_dog.jpg

Dawn Davies, Executive Director for Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS) reminds pet owners that the Fourth is a holiday for pets to stay home. “It’s a stressful day. Crowds, heat, and sudden loud noises are all things that can cause even the friendliest, relaxed dog distress. And distress can cause animals to react negatively or panic and run.”

Davies also reminds pet owners that a current pet license and identification tags is so important. “This year we switched our licensing tags to PetHub digital pet ID tags and, as long as the owner has registered it, can help anyone contact a lost pet’s owner.”

“These new tags give community members the chance to help which means pets get home faster and never have to come to the shelter.” Davies notes this is extremely helpful for all involved, since the Fourth is ACC’s busiest day of the year.

WVHS offers the following tips for keeping your pet safe and stress-free for on the Fourth:

  • Make sure your pets are in a secure space with something soft to curl up with and music softly playing. 
  • Secure doors and windows.
  • Do not bring pets to any outdoor festivities where they cannot be secured and safe. 
  • Make sure any tags or identification is up to date (if you have a 2018 PetHub license, make sure you’ve registered it for free with them). 
  • Take your pet for a nice walk or have play time. A tired pet, is a relaxed pet.

If your pet becomes lost or you find a lost pet, contact ACC to file a report at 509-662-9577 or file one online, where you can also view photos of found animals. A visit to the shelter on July 5th, to see if your pet was brought in by ACC or a concerned citizen is also recommended.

About WVHS
Founded in 1967, the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society is a private non-profit organization and our mission is to serve the community through education, protection and pet adoptions. We continue our mission by taking care of displaced pets, rescuing injured and lost animals, continuing our spay/neuter program, investigating cruelties and finding homes for the orphaned animals. If you would like to volunteer, donate, or more information on how you can help us, please email wvhs@wenatcheehumane.org or call (509) 662-9577.

###