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Wenatchee Valley Humane Society Receives $1000 Grant

WENATCHEE, WA- Wenatchee Valley Humane Society, Wenatchee, has received a $1000 from Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Program grant from The Petfinder Foundation. The Petfinder Foundation Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship Program grant is used to cover tuition cost for one person, from the Petfinder member’s organization, to attend a Dogs Playing for Life Mentorship session.  This grant program is part of our commitment to enhancing shelter dogs’ quality of life by allowing them to engage in natural social behaviors.      

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The Petfinder.com Foundation assists the 12,000+ animal shelters and rescue groups that post their adoptable pets on Petfinder.com. A nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, the Petfinder Foundation helps adoption organizations find homes for the pets in their care through its Sponsor A Pet, Disaster Fund, Quality of Life and other programs. Since its founding in 2003, the Petfinder Foundation has given more than $20 million in cash and product grants to shelters and rescue groups in the United States, Canada and Mexico.

Wenatchee Valley Humane Society posts its adoptable pets at www.petfinder.com/shelters/WA139.html.

DOG ATTACK REPORTED IN SOUTH WENATCHEE

WENATCHEE- On the afternoon of November 22, 2017, Animal Care and Control received a report of a dog attack. The reporting party stated that a brindle-colored Pit Bull-type of dog attacked her Pomeranian on the corner of S. Mission Street and Antles Street in Wenatchee, between 9:30 and 10:00 p.m. the previous evening. Reporting party states the owner of the Pitbull-type dog was a thin man of average height and ran diagonal towards S. Viewdale St. There were no distinguishing marks on the attacking dog nor was it wearing a collar. Reporting party’s dog sustained serious injuries from the attack.

If you have any possible information identifying this Pit Bull-type dog or its owner, please contact Animal Care & Control at 509-662-9577, option 1.


 

ANNUAL HOLIDAY EVENT COMES WITH A TWIST THIS YEAR

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WENATCHEE- Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS) is hosting its annual holiday event on December 2, 2017 from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at Pybus Event Center, located at Pybus Public Market. This year’s event, sponsored by Nutrisource Pet Foods, features a brunch, complete with Bloody Marys and Mimosas, and musical entertainment provided by Wenatchee Valley Appleaires

Historically, the WVHS holiday event has been a luncheon format but this year will feature a brunch menu instead. Although format has changed, the event is bringing back some crowd favorites, including the holiday wreath raffle and a retail section selling WVHS branded items, including holiday tree ornaments.

Other event sponsors include: PetHub, Tranquility Day Spa and Inside Design Carpet One. Early bird ticket prices, through November 18, are $25.00 each and increase to $30 after. All proceeds from Holiday Brunch benefit WVHS medical fund. Purchase your tickets online or in person, at WVHS.

ROVER GOES DIGITAL IN THE WENATCHEE VALLEY

WENATCHEE- PetHub.com, the world’s fastest way to get lost pets home, and Wenatchee Valley Animal Care and Control (ACC), serving Chelan and Douglas counties where an estimated 36% of households have pets, have teamed up to offer four-legged family members a new 21st century ID tag that promises to increase the chances of a lost animal’s return while reducing the number of animals in shelters.

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“96% of animals returned by PetHub are home in less than a day, before they enter a shelter,” said Dawn Davies, Executive Director of Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS). “That’s the kind of powerful tool we want to give pet parents throughout the Wenatchee Valley.” Such results will support ACC in its goal of getting pets back to their families more quickly, and helping to reduce the number of animals in the shelter.

“Over $2 billion is spent annually by shelters in the U.S. to provide food, critical care, and a safe bed to lost animals,” said Tom Arnold, Founder of PetHub.com. “Our goal is to get a lost dog or cat home before it can become injured through fights with other animals, taken in by strangers thinking the dog is homeless, or enter a shelter.”

PetHub’s system links a physical ID tag to an animal’s online profile that can be accessed through an encrypted connection by anyone with a mobile device, whether a smartphone or standard cellular phone. That profile can be updated free-of-charge at PetHub.com to allow the owner to list emergency contact information, including that of anyone who helps care for the animal, such as spouses, pet sitters, veterinarians, and other family and friends. Optional upgrades include “found pet” alerts, GPS notifications, and a way to broadcast a missing pet’s profile to local shelters and businesses (think “Amber alert,” but for pets).

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“We were also excited to learn that when pet parent’s choose to upgrade to PetHub’s optional premium service, PetHub will donate a portion of that revenue back to WVHS which will help us in offering critical services to the animals in our region,” said Davies.

The new licensing program launched November 1, 2017 and have been received well in the community. “Effective this month, anyone renewing a pet license online at www.wenatcheehumane.org, or renewing or purchasing a new license in-person at WVHS, will receive the new digital ID tag that is ‘powered by PetHub,’” said Davies. “We are incredibly excited to bring these new, durable, modern and effective pet ID tags into our community.”

Click here for more information about digital IDs and eligible locations,

DOG ATTACK REPORTED NEAR WENATCHEE SCHOOL

WENATCHEE- On the evening of October 30, 2017, Animal Care & Control got a call about a dog attack. The reporting party stated that a very tall, strong looking dog with sleek gray fur came out while she was walking her dog in the 1300 block of McKittrick Street, in Wenatchee.

The unknown dog attacked her leashed dog and would not release it until another witness, in a vehicle, stopped to help and honking her car horn to create a startling noise. The dog ran from both parties, heading east in the direction of the large, fenced field of Foothills Middle School.

The Animal Control officer responding to the call patrolled the area and spoke with a few nearby residents, but was unable to identify the dog.

If you have any possible information identifying this large gray dog, please contact Animal Care & Control at 509-662-9577, option 1.

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SPAY/NEUTER CLINIC SEES RECORD NUMBERS

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WENATCHEE- Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS) hosted a low-income spay/neuter clinic for cats Saturday, October 21. The clinic, sponsored by Community Cat Coalition and numerous community donors, served many families and stray cats in our area and set a clinic record of 106 cats altered. Unowned cats were ear-tipped – a process to show they are altered, vaccinated, and live in our community. The clinic, held quarterly, is open by appointment to low-income household in the Wenatchee Valley. Services provided include: spay/neuter, rabies and FVRCP (distemper) vaccines.

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Dr. Brad Crauer, Medical Director at WVHS, performed many surgeries and several local veterinarians volunteered surgery time, including: Dr. Harmeling, Dr. Miller, Dr. Warmenhoven, Dr. Eichler, and Dr. Womack (all of Cascade Veterinary Clinic) with assistance from Cheryl Stuart (Animal Hospital of Wenatchee) and Alison Womack. Also in attendance were Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine students Tristan Troudt, Malkolm Graffe, Alison Herendeen, and Clinical Assistant Professor Dr. Matt Mickas. WVHS volunteer Dr. Kathy Archibald assisted, along with more than twenty diligent and hard-working WVHS volunteers.

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To date, these clinics have altered nearly 1,000 cats – both feral/community and domestic. WVHS is dedicated to keeping spay/neuter clinics in our community to assist getting cats in low-income households altered.

Spay and neutering is the best way to keep cat populations from quickly turning from a few into thousands of unwanted cats within a few years. For more information on our low-income spay and neuter program, or to make a tax-deductible donation, contact the WVHS at (509) 662-9577 or visit online at wenatcheehumane.org.

 About WVHS
Founded in 1967, the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society is a private non-profit organization and our mission is to serve the community through education, protection and pet adoptions. We continue our mission by taking care of displaced pets, rescuing injured and lost animals, continuing our spay/neuter program, investigating cruelties and finding homes for the orphaned animals. If you would like to volunteer, donate, or more information on how you can help us, please email wvhs@wenatcheehumane.org or call (509) 662-9577.

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PET LOVER’S VISION BECOMES SUCCESSFUL EVENT FOR LOCAL SHELTER

WENATCHEE- The Ol’ Dog Days concert, held at Sunshine Ranch late last month, raised over $4,000 for Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS). The funds will go to benefit WVHS’s Spay and Neuter clinics, which serve both owned and stray pets in throughout the Wenatchee Valley.

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The concert, which featured music by Eden Moody, Michael Carlos Band and Dustin Hays, was the brainchild of three passionate pet owners, Rebecca Heffron, Corrine Hoffman and Lisa Petit. The women knew they wanted to put an event together to support WVHS, but the idea was brought to life after a brainstorming session during a hair appointment.

With the location secured, thanks to Petit, who owns Sunshine Ranch with her husband Brad, the women then solicited donations, secured the talent and set out on a mission to sell tickets. Adoptable dogs, along with some alumni animals from WVHS, including Heffron’s pooch, Mayor Chispita, were on hand to enjoy the event. Food was provided, in-kind, by Fred Meyer and 2 Chefs Catering. Beverages were also donated by Pear Up Cidery, Wenatchee Valley Brewing, Kestrel Winery and Weinstein Beverages. Doghouse Motorsports sponsored the musicians. The event also boasted several raffle baskets, all also donated.

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"I was pleasantly surprised at the success of our first annual fundraiser and am looking forward to next year being even bigger and better! Thank you for all the support for our wonderful locals for our amazing Wenatchee Valley Humane Society," Heffron said about the event’s success.

Heffron says the trio is working hard, along with a few other key volunteers, and are aiming for a late July or early August event at the Ranch next year.

DOG BITE REPORTED IN CASHMERE

Wenatchee Valley Animal Care & Control received a call regarding a dog bite that happened on Thursday 07/20/2017 between 9:30 and 10:00 am. The bite occurred at the intersection of Elberta Ave & Woodring St in Cashmere.

The dog owner is described as being an average height, white male that walks in the area on a regular basis with his dogs. The suspect usually walks with a larger, white fluffy dog on a leash and a Blue Healer type dog that is mostly off leash. The biting dog is the Blue healer type dog. Verification of a current rabies vaccination is needed for this dog.

If anyone recognizes this suspect please call Wenatchee Valley Animal Care & Control at 509-662-9577 Ext 1. Thank You.

DOG BITE LAKE WENATCHEE

At around 5pm on Thursday evening a 7 year old boy was bit by an all-black Doberman Pinscher type dog near Lake Wenatchee. The owners of the dog stayed until the ambulance arrived to take the boy to the hospital where he was treated for a bite wound to his leg. The Doberman was on a leash along with along with a German Shepherd. The boy was bit when he ran by the dog. The mother of the boy did not get the dog owners information, but believes that a group of them were staying at Thousand Trails Campground. Thousand Trails believes the dog owners may have left. Wenatchee Valley Animal Care & Control would like to verify that the dog is currently vaccinated for rabies. If you have information about the owners, please contact 662-9577 Opt 1.

ANNOUNCING THE APPOINTMENT OF DR. BRAD CRAUER IN-HOUSE SHELTER VETERINARIAN

Dawn Davies, executive director of the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society (WVHS), announces the appointment of Dr. Brad Crauer to the recently-created position of in-house shelter veterinarian. Dr. Crauer will be responsible for overseeing a shelter medicine program at WVHS, with a strong emphasis on spay/neuter surgery.

“This appointment helps us realize a dream we have been working on for some time,” notes Davies. “We want every homeless animal that comes through our doors to have a thorough in-house vet check-up, and to receive spay/neuter surgery as quickly as possible to ensure they are ready for adoption with little delay.”

Davies points out that the volume of spay/neuter surgeries the shelter requires can often overwhelm the important partnerships WVHS has with the veterinarian community in our area. “With an in-house veterinarian, these will be handled more efficiently, and routine health checks will avoid delays in treatment,” Davies says. “We will still need to rely on our veterinarian partners for more complex surgeries and treatments on specific cases, and greatly appreciate all they do for us, often without advance warning, and during evening and weekend hours.”

Dr. Crauer has served as Assistant Professor at Kansas State University, where he developed a shelter medicine program. Prior to joining the faculty at Kansas State University, he served as Seattle Humane Society’s Chief Medical Officer and as an Adjunct Professor at Washington State University. He is a 1991 Iowa State University graduate with over 20 years of experience as a veterinarian and administrator in private practice, emergency and shelter facilities.

“When Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans, Dr. Crauer acted as an advisor to FEMA and was the lead veterinarian in charge of rescue, triage, treatment and long-term management of an evacuation shelter,” Davies says. “We believe his background equips him very well for the position at WVHS.”
Dr. Crauer’s family includes his wife, two college age children, two dogs and two Katrina rescue cats. He will begin his position at WVHS in July of this year.

REPORT OF DOG ATTACK

Wenatchee Valley Animal Care & Control received a report of a dog attack on Monday, May 8th on the 600 block of Grover Place in East Wenatchee around 9:30pm.

Two adult pit bull type dogs, one white and gray, the other blue or gray, entered the backyard of a private home. The two dogs attacked two cats that lived at the home, killing one and causing enough harm to the second that it needed to be humanely euthanized.

The homeowner did not recognize the dogs, so does not know who the owner is. The Animal Control officer who responded saw the dogs, but was unable to contain them.

If you have any information that can help us contact the dog’s owner, please call Wenatchee Valley Animal Care & Control at 509-662-9577, option 1.

“EMO” COULDN’T WAIT FOR HELP A HORSE DAY – HE JUST WANTS TO WALK AGAIN!

Horses come in all shapes and sizes and their needs vary too, including a healthy diet, fresh water, vaccinations, having their hooves trimmed and regular dental checks.

Yesterday, this brave, little, 20 year old Shetland Pony was surrendered to WVHS because he was lame and could not walk. “Emo” is suffering from a very painful condition known as founder or laminitis, affecting his hooves. Founder is a crippling condition and in severe cases, can be fatal. With care, it can be managed but not cured.

Large animal Veterinarian Bryce Davisson, DVM administered pain medication so that “Emo” could be loaded into a trailer and moved to foster care. His pain is being treated with daily medication, diet and love. “It was so encouraging to see him voluntarily take a few steps this morning, but he still has a long ways to go. It’s literally, one step at a time.” says Dawn Davies, Executive Director.

The veterinarian will need to re-evaluate “Emo” in a few days to gauge his ability to improve. His hooves were compacted with debris, adding to his pain and discomfort, so they will need to be trimmed slowly, taking off a little at a time. His teeth are long, some even have sharp points or hooks. “Emo” will need a full dental so that he can chew his food and get the nutrition he needs. His winter hair is matted and needs grooming, but mostly, he needs to walk to keep his circulation going.

Join us for Help A Horse Day to learn more about horses, how to care for them, meet some of the amazing people who work with local horses, grab a treat at our bake sale, meet two adoptable horses, check out our newly raised barn and try your luck at a raffle! We will be having so much fun, and hope you’ll join us Wednesday, April 26th noon-4pm at WVHS.

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REPORT OF A DOG BITE ON SATURDAY, MARCH 4TH

the 800 block of Kittitas Street in Wenatchee.

A homeowner on Kittitas was moving a piece of furniture when a man passed by and offered to help him. The man had a black and tan Miniature Pinscher type dog with him, who was on a leash. The local mail carrier passed by on his route and was bitten on the ankle by the dog. The bite broke the skin, but did not do any severe damage.

Neither the homeowner, nor the mail carrier knew who the man was, though they did gather that his name is Paul.

Animal Care & Control needs to speak with Paul to determine if the dog is current on its rabies vaccination.

If you have any information that can help us contact the dog’s owner, please call Wenatchee Valley Animal Care & Control at 509-662- 9577, option 1.

WENATCHEE VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY CELEBRATES ASPCA HELP A HORSE DAY

Community support needed for chance to win up to $25,000 ASPCA grant to help save more horses 

Wenatchee, WA. (Feb. 3nd 2017) — Wenatchee Valley Humane Society will be celebrating the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) national Help A Horse Day on April 22-26 and competing for a chance to win up to $25,000 in grant prizes to assist with their efforts to protect horses. To celebrate the day, WVHS will be hosting a family friendly event on April 26th 2017 from 12-4pm in honor of the ASPCA’s 150thAnniversary celebration this year, the contest has been expanded to include a total of $100,000 in grant prizes, including a grand prize of $25,000.

This nationwide competition is for equine rescues and sanctuaries to raise awareness about the lifesaving work they do year-round to care for at-risk horses in their community who have often been abused or neglected. Horses have been central to the ASPCA’s work since its founding 150 years ago, when Henry Bergh stopped a cart driver from beating his horse, resulting in the first successful arrest for the mistreatment of a horse on April 26, 1866.

The ASPCA Help A Horse Day contest is a wonderful opportunity for our team to welcome the residents and businesses of Wenatchee into our barn to help spread awareness about the at-risk horses in our community who are in need of loving homes,” said Dawn Davies, Executive Director of the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society.  “Horses are majestic, loving animals, and we hope our local supporters will come out on April 26th2017 to help us win a $25,000 grant so we can continue our lifesaving efforts for years to come.”

  • Wenatchee Valley Humane society with the help of animal care and control completes wellness checks on at risk equines as well as seizes horses in neglect situations.
  • Our help a horse day will be held on April 26th with a fun, free family friendly event showcasing some adoptable horses from local rescues as well as games, Educational sessions from local equine businesses and our Chelan and Douglas county 4-H clubs.
  • Bailey and Sandy were two horses Animal Care and Control seized in a cruelty case. The two were confined together in a small 10 feet by 20 foot pen with no access to water. The pen was constructed of precarious barbed wire and was not safe for the horses to be confined in. The horses were malnourished, emaciated and severely dehydrated. They looked as though a horse skeleton had been draped in fur with no muscle tone or fat. When Animal care and control went to seize the horses one of them had become trapped in the barbed wire fencing and had to be cut free.

Today these horses are well fed, have great muscle tone and are happy as can be. They were brought to WVHS and kept here for a few days until a foster home was found where they were socialized and well cared for. Finding these horses a loving home was not hard as their sweet faces just begged to be loved. We were quickly able to unite them with their forever homes. We love happy tails!